October 2017 Album Round Up!

Why is it that every single year, the last week of October is always the greatest (and, well, busiest) week of the year for music listeners? As much as I know it isn’t, it feels so random to me. If I were a musician, I’d honestly feel comfortable with any release date between the months of April and June, or September to November. But there must be something about this particular week that only the accountants at Atlantic, Columbia and Warner Bros. can explain.

On October 28th of last year, I remember walking out of F.Y.E. with the biggest shit-eating grin on my face, now in possession of brand new records from Avenged Sevenfold, Testament, Serpentine Dominion, and Empire of the Sun. And I’d still barely scratched the surface. 2017 was no different. On October 27th, an overwhelming influx of new music saw the light of day, including but not limited to: Blut Aus Nord, Yelawolf, The Used, Yo Gotti, Weezer, Ty Dolla $ign, Hollywood Undead, Theory of a Deadman, and Winds of Plague. Whew. I’m still catching up. Which might explain why this fucking Round Up is getting posted two days before Thanksgiving.

I hope you enjoy my thoughts on this month’s albums, and believe me – there is a LOT to look forward to by the end of the year! I’ve already giddily begun prepping my numerous Year-End lists, so definitely stay tuned! And for God’s sake, please watch that credit limit this Friday. We wouldn’t want to buy a fucking boat for some middle manager at Visa.

The Sin and the Sentence – Trivium

 The eighth record from these mainstream Metal mainstays (and my personal favorite band from ages 13 – 15) is nothing short of a return to form. The band’s creative decline that plagued their last six years of music – beginning with 2013’s stale Vengeance Falls and continuing with the divisive, radio-friendly Silence in the Snow in 2015 – abruptly ends here with a set of tracks that up the ante considerably on aggression and on musicianship, the latter in part due to the addition of virtuoso drummer Alex Bent. Aside from a few missteps in the track list (e.g. the whiny throwaway ballad “Endless Night”), The Sin and the Sentence should electrify diehard supports and galvanize old fans whose support has waned in recent years.In particular, “Thrown Into the Fire” and “The Revanchist” are two of the best songs of Trivium’s entire career. Here is a full review. RECOMMENDED

Pacific Daydream – Weezer

 Frankly, I’m still enjoying the hell out of The White Album – Weezer’s 2016 effort that found its way onto my Top 10 Albums of the Year last December – so it wasn’t gonna be the end of the world for me if the band’s surprisingly quick follow-up was a slight disappointment. And I’m glad the stakes were low, because as it just so happens, Pacific Daydream was exactly that. Forgettable, cookie cutter material like “Mexican Fender” and “Get Right” are severe momentum killers on both the front and back end of this 34-minute LP. All was not lost, however – mid-album highlights like the wistful “Happy Hour” and the knockout hook on “Weekend Woman” kept it from being a total letdown. We’ll just have to wait and see if the band’s forthcoming Black Album finds them back on track. Here is a full review. NOT RECOMMENDED

Trial By Fire – Yelawolf

One of 2017’s brightest gems that I never saw coming, Yelawolf’s barely-promoted third studio album finds the ambitious but wildly inconsistent Alabama MC finally putting all the pieces together on Trial By Fire, his exceptional third LP for Eminem’s Shady Records. All of my favorite music has one thing in common: it takes you out of your surroundings and transports you to another world, and Yelawolf does exactly that on here. Soundtracked with an imaginative fusion of Country, Blues, Folk, Rock, and Hip-Hop, Yelawolf brings you straight down to his native Alabama with intensely autiobiographical dirt road rhymes and his singular, snarling Southern drawl. We’ll surely be chatting about Trial By Fire next month when I recap my favorite Hip-Hop albums of 2017, but for now, at least check out essential tracks like “Ride or Die”, the Juicy J-assisted “Punk”, and the haunting “Sabrina”. Here is a full review. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

 Lil’ Pump – Lil’ Pump

 I cannot believe this nonsense hit number 3 on the Billboard Charts. I could make this whole mixtape in five minutes. Lil’ Pump’s brand of “Soundcloud” rap is as obnoxious as it is repetitive – there’s absolutely nothing redeeming about the headache-inducing flows on songs like “Gucci Gang”, “Crazy”, and the opener “What U Sayin’”. And even the star power of Rick Ross on “Pinky Ring” doesn’t help, because that discordant fire alarm-mimicking instrumental makes me genuinely angry for the duration of the song, regardless of who’s rhyming. Maybe I’m out of touch, but I really don’t understand what any of these hipster critics see in this shit. NOT RECOMMENDED

Judas – Fozzy

 One of my least favorite Rock releases of the entire year, the seventh LP from Fozzy – the band fronted by WWE Superstar Chris Jericho – is overproduced, formulaic Radio-Rock trash. “Three Days in Jail” is a particularly embarrassing moment as the band briefly attempt to resurrect Nu Metal (yes, rapping and all!) before returning to their cookie cutter Butt Rock. It’s a shame, because I’ve considered myself a fan since I was a teeanger (Chasing the Grail and Sin and Bones still get regular rotation in my car), but Judas better not indicate the direction the band is headed, or they’ve lost me. Here is a full review. NOT RECOMMENDED

Super Slimey – Future & Young Thug

 If people’s would’ve just fucking RELAXED with their unreasonable expectations for this high-profile Watch the Throne-type collab between two of Hip-Hop’s hottest acts, I guarantee they would’ve all enjoyed Super Slimey a hell of a lot more. I sure did. It’s noticeably unrefined and it’s far from perfect, but bangers like “Three” and the Offset-featuring “Patek Water”, as well as the hazy “All Da Smoke” made this auto-tuned meeting of the minds more than worth it. Especially when compared with Future and Drake’s lackluster collaborative What a Time To Be Alive tape from two years ago. RECOMMENDED

Nightbringers – Black Dahlia Murder

 Chalk up another “W” for Black Dahlia Murder. Their first LP to feature lead guitarist Brandon Ellis finds the Michigan metallers right back in tip-top form – in particular, the tracks “As Good As Dead” and the title cut now rank in my top 10 songs of the band’s entire sixteen year career. Here is a full review. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

 Beautiful Trauma – P!nk

 A true dud from the Pop world this past month, the rest of P!nk’s seventh album proves to be even sappier and more vanilla than its sappy and vanilla lead single, “What About Us”. Despite a decent chorus or two (e.g. “Better Life”) or the catchy dance pulse of “Secrets”, there’s just too much major label money riding on this record for it to be interesting. Not even Eminem’s guest appearance on “Revenge” is interesting, and significantly less interesting is P!nk’s pseudo-rapping attempts on that same track. Yikes. NOT RECOMMENDED

 E – Enslaved

 One of the Black Metal’s most important and adventurous trailblazers, Enslaved have been pushing the genre’s envelope for over a quarter century now, constantly searching for more clever ways to fuse the style’s more traditional sounds with the likes of Prog Metal and even various types of Rock music. On E, the band take another step forward, crafting masterful Blackened Prog Metal epics (if that’s, I guess, a genre now?) like “Hiindsiight” and “Sacred Horse”, which co-exist harmoniously alongside more direct cuts like “The River’s Mouth” and “What Else Is There”. An absolutely essential Metal listen, and an outstanding achievement even by Enslaved’s lofty standards. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

 Losing Sleep – Chris Young

Given that his new LP consists of only ten tracks and a runtime of exactly a half hour, I figured it wasn’t a huge investment to give Country superstar Chris Young a shot. This year I’ve finally started to acquire a taste for one of music’s most critically dismissed genres – good ol’ Country – and Young is one of dozens of beloved mainstream artists that I’ve yet to try on for size. Well, you can imagine my disdain when I was greeted with the exact type of Pop Country genericism that makes people discriminate against this style of music. More often than not, the central lyrical topic of this album is just fucking DRINKING, and nothing else. And the closer “Blacked Out” is supposed to be this tear-stained, heartbroken ballad, but it comes across so shallow with its references to Ray Bans and Mustangs and ten thousand more allusions to – you guessed it – drinking. For Country music in October 2017, the real winner was Darius Rucker with his new LP When Was the Last Time – you’re better off checking out that one and giving Losing Sleep a hard pass. NOT RECOMMENDED

A FEW MORE:

LIKE:

Thinking Out Loud – Young Dolph

When Was the Last Time – Darius Rucker

Blood of My Enemy – Winds of Plague

4Eva Is a Mighty Long Time – Big K.R.I.T.

Heaven Upside Down – Marilyn Manson

Reaper – Nothing.Nowhere.

DON’T LIKE:

True View – Stick to Your Guns

Cold Like War – We Came As Romans

False Idol – Veil of Maya

I Still Am – Yo Gotti

Beach House 3 – Ty Dolla $ign

Deus Salutius Meae – Blut Aus Nord

 

Trivium’s “The Sin and the Sentence” Single

Nearly two years since 2015’s risky, deliberately minimal Silence in the Snow, the most hateable Metal band on the planet is back with LP number eight, and – I can only assume – another polarizing sound.

Silence in the Snow was perhaps Trivium’s sharpest, ballsiest left turn since 2006’s wildly controversial The Crusade, the infamous record that saw vocalist Matt Heafy abandon the heaven-and-hell scream/sing approach that was prevalent at the time for an opportunity to do his best James Hetfield impersonation. Silence of the Snow found the band once again scrapping their signature screamed vocals from the playbook and intentionally writing simpler, more melodic songs as a way to emulate ‘70s and ‘80s greats like Rainbow and Iron Maiden. The experiment had mixed results, but I admired the effort. I always prefer bands try something new.

Fast-forward to August 2017, and we have “The Sin and the Sentence”, the first single from the Floridians’ as-of-yet untitled eighth album. Being the rebellious, mischievous bunch that they are, they decided to put it out on a Tuesday instead of, you know, Friday, the widely designated day of the week to launch new music. So punk rock.

As with pretty much every Trivium release, you can’t compare this new sound to any one record of theirs. While the “The Sin and the Sentence” maintains the emphasis on Heafy’s (increasingly powerful) clean vocals, the music is significantly heavier this time around. New drummer Alex Bent brings an urgent intensity to the track, complete with rapid-fire bursts of double bass and even a few traditional blast beats tossed in for good measure. His relentless athletics in the song’s epic twin-guitar intro give it a bit of an Arch Enemy flavor.

The catchy, groovy chorus finds Heafy in a duet with himself, as he overlaps clean and harsh vocals in a snappy call-and-response. To be honest, this memorable section helps distract from some of the track’s shortcomings; for starters, from a guitar standpoint, many of the musical ideas presented here are blatantly derivative. The pedal tone riff at 3:05 is not only boring but CERTAINLY recycled, as is the similarly generic riff at 5:25 (also, during the latter, why does he feel the need to randomly yell “FUCK!” for no reason?)

The harmonized neo-classical lead riff at 3:37 is also suspect, and adds to my growing suspicion based on recent albums that the band are simply OUT of new solo ideas. Lastly, I gotta take issue with that dumb three-chord palm-muted progression that kicks off the first verse; it makes me feel like I’m listening to a Pop-Punk band.

All things considered, however, “The Sin and the Sentence” is a step in the right direction for the band. I don’t want to speak too soon, but on my first handful of listens, I’d consider this the best Trivium song since 2011. It brings melody and aggression in equal doses, it’s a bit more indulgent and technical, and it re-introduces some exciting elements to the Trivium sound, most notably Alex Bent’s blast beats and some good ol’ Metalcore riffing (if a bit unoriginal). Looking forward to hearing more from Trivium in the coming months!