My Summer ’16 Soundtrack: The Top 20 Songs

Well guys, the first day of Fall – or the “autumnal equinox” if you’re pretentious – is upon us, as is our official goodbye to Summer Sixteen. What we’re left with, aside from a month-long hangover and a couple genital warts, is a bunch of memories. More specifically, we’re left with the memories and the songs that accompany them. Seriously, the sheer power of the music-memory connection is mindblowing. (Example: two years ago, I had a severe panic attack in the middle of the Taconic Parkway in upstate New York while Wiz Khalifa’s “Bout Y’all” was playing, and to this day, I still can’t hear that track without losing my shit. It’s a shame, ‘cause it’s a banger.) This potent connection is bested only by the smell-memory link (Olfaction to Hippocampus), which any Neuroscientist will get a sizable boner explaining to you.

So whenever a meaningful chapter in my life closes, it always gets me thinking: what was my soundtrack? What are the songs that, until my liver finally calls it quits or an ex-girlfriend stabs me in my sleep, are gonna be intertwined with the good, the bad, and the ugly of this time period in my life? With Summer Sixteen coming to an end, I reached into the depths of my neurotic mind and these are the songs I yanked out. Below are brief thoughts on each one, and I’ve even compiled a Spotify playlist at the bottom for your listening pleasure.

This is what my Summer sounded like, and consequently, it’s what soul crushing nostalgia is gonna sound like for me in 2040. What did yours sound like? Let me know in the comments. I hope you’ve already given day one of Autumn a swift kick in the ass! Peace out Summer Sixteen!

(Girl We Got A) Good Thing – Weezer

If you ever wondered what summer “sounds like”, here’s your answer.

Sometimes – Ariana Grande

My favorite Pop song of the entire year. Max Martin’s impossibly smooth production reminds me of his work on Backstreet Boys’ Millenium.

KISA – Rittz

On Rittz’s brilliant, hard-hitting Top of the Line, the sappy love song also happens to be my favorite. Bite me.

Roses – Carly Rae Jepsen

Every single track on last month’s Emotion: Side B EP is a contender, but “Roses” takes the cake for me. It’s moody by Carly Rae standards, and perhaps that’s why I have a slightly deeper connection with it than peppy songs like “First Time”.

Everything– Atmosphere

Slug’s hyper self-aware rhymes and Ant’s knocking production make this a quintessential Atmosphere track.

Do You Mind – DJ Khaled

I love this sensual banger from DJ Khaled’s absurdly hyped Major Key LP. The production is a bit of a call back to Rich Gang’s “Lifestyle”, and Future’s guest verse is low key one of the best moments of his career.

Collapse – Vektor

Vektor’s Progressive Thrash opus Terminal Redux is still my number one Metal album of 2016 thus far. And yes, it’s fucking blistering, but it’s actually the LP’s pseudo-ballad that I’ve found myself coming back to the most.

Shelter –Porter Robinson & Madeon

 My two favorite EDM artists broke the Internet with this collaborative single, and it sounds exactly how I had hoped – like Madeon’s Adventure and Porter’s Worlds enjoyed some good ol’ passionate shtupping.

John Muir – ScHoolboy Q

Q’s menacing delivery and Sounwave’s throbbing boom bap – complemented by a touch of Jazz in the hook – are a lethal combination.

Whatever, Wherever – Band of Horses

Another stare-up-at-the-stars-and-think-about-life song from Band of Horses. Gorgeous, calming…everything I’ve come to adore about “Factory”, “Infinite Arms”, “The Funeral”, and the softer moments in the band’s catalogue. I often wonder if other listeners extract the same mood from these songs that I do – if not, chalk another thing up to my weirdness.

Hologram – Crown the Empire

 Histrionic metalcore angst at its most shameless. Normally it doesn’t fly with me, but “Hologram” is so fucking catchy.

Night Drive Loneliness – Garbage

Over two decades after their self-titled masterpiece, Garbage are still killing it. This standout from their new record Strange Little Birds – which came out in June – is the perfect sonic execution of its titular concept.

Stranded – Gojira

In stripping down their pulverizing sound for something a bit hookier, Gojira took a huge risk with Magma, the band’s sixth album. But it’s the most commercial song on it that ended up being my favorite!

 Cleaving Giants of Ice – Revocation

The mammoth closing track from Great Is Our Sin proves that Death Metal and clean vocals DO mix when done right! Prominent Enslaved influence here.

Stole the Show – Kygo

Overall, I was pretty turned off by the excessively commercial sound of Kygo’s debut, but “Stole the Show” was, ironically, my most beat-to-death party song of the summer ‘16.

Dive In – Pierce the Veil

I’ll give Pierce the Veil the gold medal for biggest surprise of 2016 thus far. I usually avoid verb-the-noun bands like the plague, but their new record Misadventures and its explosive opening track are undeniable.

The Fighter – Keith Urban

As with Kygo, I hated the album, but fell in love with a select track. “The Fighter” is a powerful duet with Carrie Underwood.

Something’s Off – Hatebreed

One of the very best songs of Hatebreed’s two-decade career. What a monstrous main groove! And in the bridge section, Jamey Jasta’s foray into clean singing is an absolute triumph.

Ideology is Theft – Saosin

For some reason, the bridge in this song yanks a tremendous amount of emotion out of me every single time I hear it. That addicting lead guitar riff in the chorus doesn’t hurt either.

Love Drought – Beyonce

 This is the song Drizzy Drake wishes he could pull off

 

Hatebreed’s “A.D.” and Volbeat’s “The Devil’s Bleeding Crown” Singles

Happy April 8th, 2016 everyone! Time to grab your copies of Deftones’ Gore and Zakk Wylde’s Book of Shadows II to celebrate! In addition, I’ve written up a pair of new singles from Hatebreed and Volbeat below:

 A.D. – Hatebreed

Connecticut’s own Hatebreed will unleash their seventh album The Concrete Confessional on May 13th – a Friday the 13th already jam-packed with high-profile releases (Devildriver, Gorguts, Pierce the Veil, and the very brutal Meaghan Trainor, just to name a few). The LP’s opening track “A.D.” is our first complete taste of what’s to come, and it finds the veterans placing their Hardcore influences on the backburner for a majority of the song in favor of mid-80s Thrash, even tossing in a shred-laced guitar solo for good measure.

Even vocalist/motivational coach Jamey Jasta knows that not every Hatebreed song needs to be uplifting, positive, or hopeful – if the state of the union (or the world) is chewing at him for whatever reason, there’s no better platform. And Jasta takes advantage – A.D. is jam-packed with venomous quotables that address the crumbling of the American dream.

The latter portion of the track deals with the inaction and subsequent profiting of media and government outfits from violent shootings, acts of terrorism, and the like. Here’s a choice quote that prompted a tweet of mine (and a subsequent retweet from Hatebreed themselves): “thoughts and prayers again, is that what it’ll take? Which industries profit while lives are at stake?” HARD.

The Devil’s Bleeding Crown – Volbeat

Seal the Deal & Let’s Boogie….that’s what Volbeat chose to title their new album? Hey, no complaints here – it made me chuckle, and quite frankly, anything that’s not a fucking self-titled record is fine in my book. Seal the Deal & Let’s Boogie will follow two Metal-tinged Rock LPs that are absurdly well-constructed – 2010’s Beyond Hell/Above Heaven and 2013’s Outlaw Gentlemen & Shady Ladies. A band still very much in the midst of their ascent – let’s be honest, we have virtually no idea how big this could get – they could put out a by-the-book replication of their last two efforts and still receive resounding acclaim. They have become one of Rock’s most beloved and likable acts.

“The Devil’s Bleeding Crown” retains Volbeat’s familiar mammoth sound. As expected it’s completely old school, the main riff calling to mind a chunkier Wolfmother. And I suppose the ghost of Black Sabbath’s “Children of the Grave” will continue to hover over the genre for all of eternity, so no need for any painfully obvious insights in that regard.

The bottom line: fans of Volbeat anthems like “A Warrior’s Call” will be fully satiated by this single. But here’s to hoping there are a few twists and turns on the full record, out June 3rd.