AVENGED SEVENFOLD: Top 10 Deep Cuts!

One more Avenged Sevenfold video! That Diamonds in the Rough re-release really has me on a roll.

This is one of the best videos I’ve ever done, and a must-watch for Avenged fans! After much deliberation (don’t worry, honorable mentions are included) I dig into my picks for the 10 best deep cuts in the A7x catalogue. From Sounding the Seventh Trumpet to Diamonds in the Rough to The Stage, this is a comprehensive trip through the band’s discography for their most devout fans to enjoy.

Watch the full video here:

Avenged Sevenfold – Diamonds in the Rough: The Four ESSENTIAL Songs!

What’s up, guys! Happy album release day to all of you.

As usual, most of the music I’m diving into today is brand spankin’ new (Green Day, Sepultura, Galantis, God Dethroned, etc.), but I can’t shake this strange feeling that I’m in some sort of time machine….

That’s because even though last I checked it’s February 2020, Avenged Sevenfold are releasing a b-sides album for their 2007 self-titled album. Nearly 13 years too late.

OK, that’s not entirely true. They’re repackaging and updating 2008’s Diamonds in the Rough for streaming services, and even including one brand new unreleased song for good measure.

Since there’s undoubtedly a lot of Gen Z A7x fans who didn’t even know these songs existed, I figured it’d be fun to take a trip down memory lane and dissect what I believe are the four essential tracks from this rarities collection. Because contrary to what the band clearly believe, some of the material on Diamonds in the Rough was completely worthy of inclusion on the self-titled album. But of course, that’s for us to debate!

You can find the full video here:

 

Avenged Sevenfold – Set Me Free Track Review

Ah, I missed talking about Avenged Sevenfold!

As we await the highly anticipated follow-up to 2016’s The Stage, A7x – likely aware that nearly three-and-a-half years is a long ass time without new music – have a new holdover scheme for us. They’re re-releasing the 2008 b-sides collection Diamonds in the Rough for streaming services.

Evidently, this “streaming version” includes at least one never-before-heard song: “Set Me Free”, originally recorded during 2013’s Hail to the King sessions.

In the video below, I give my take on this lost child of Hail to the King. Did they do the right thing leaving it on the cutting room floor? Is it a worthy track in its own right?

Check out my full thoughts in the video below, and be sure to look out for the streaming version of Diamonds in the Rough, which drops February 7th!

Avenged Sevenfold’s “The Stage” Single

The connection between a diehard fan and his musical deities of choice is one of the most powerful things on Earth. Without missing an ounce of detail, I can recall EXACTLY where I was, what I was doing, and how I was feeling the first time I heard Avenged Sevenfold’s self-titled album. I can recall EXACTLY where I was, what I was doing, and how I was feeling the first time I heard Nightmare. And I can even tell you what I ate for breakfast, lunch, AND dinner the day Hail to the King dropped (a Bacon, Egg and Cheese from Dunkin’ Donuts, a peanut butter sandwich, and a cobb salad from Route 99 in southeast Massachusetts, respectively, as if you somehow gave a shit).

Since I was a young and mischievous little preteen shithole, it has been nothing short of a MAJOR EVENT every time Avenged Sevenfold has released a new album. And the band’s yet-to-be-announced seventh album is gearing up to be another massive happening in Rock and Metal, especially after 2013’s divisive Hail to the King which was, to use a lazy comparison, A7X’s “Black Album” (look, setting aside the “Sad But True” issue, the analogy does hold up. Hail to the King found the band dialing back their usual ambitious complexity and gunning for a sound meant to fill up stadiums. The Black Album did something very similar.)

And today, the world got a small taste of the madness to come: the first new Avenged Sevenfold track in over three years, entitled “The Stage”.

A7X fans have been trained to expect sharp stylistic left turns with every new record, but “The Stage” isn’t a total 180 from Hail to the King. The song’s simple, four-on-the-floor verse groove would’ve fit snuggly into Hail’s track list, as would its booming chorus.

Elsewhere, however, “The Stage” is dominated by Synyster Gates’ guitar playing, which is definitely a change of pace. This fucking track is LITTERED with Syn’s leads, some of them harmonized, some of them not, some of them measured and melodic and some of them chaotic and shred-tastic. It’s thrilling to hear lead guitars carrying an Avenged song on their shoulders again. It’s a cornerstone of the band’s appeal to have prominent lead guitar sections woven into a song’s structure (something that’s very Maiden-esque), and it’s an element that was sorely absent in parts of Hail to the King. If I had to pinpoint one thing that Avenged diehards will be most stoked about with “The Stage”, it’s gotta be the lead guitars returning front-and-center. In particular, that harmonized solo that waltzes in around 7:10 is CLASSIC fucking Avenged. As for Synyster’s solo from 4:40 to 5:25, that’s arguably the climax of this song.

Directing our attention over to M. Shadows, his vocal approach hasn’t changed too much. He’s still as raspy, tough, and forceful as ever, and he continues to throw himself in the running for “best Axl Rose impersonator” with his sassy cadences at the tail end of the second verse.

These eight-and-a-half minutes also mark our official recorded introduction to new drummer Brooks Wackerman. Wackerman’s role in the Avenged world will likely reveal itself with the release of more material, but in the first 90 seconds of “The Stage”, his drums are more involved than Arin Ilejay’s were on the entirety of Hail to the King.

“The Stage” is nothing revolutionary . It’s not about to silence all the non-believers and change the landscape of Rock music forever. It’s not about to pit entire fanbases against each other with its wild adventurousness. But there’s more than enough here to plant the seed of optimism for long time fans. And we’re waiting with bated breath for what comes next.

Song Dissection: Avenged Sevenfold’s “Eternal Rest”

Jesus Christ, I bought this song on ITunes in 2007. Let me translate: TWO THOUSAND SEVEN. As in before IPhones were publicly released. As in before anybody knew who Justin Bieber was. As in before my first kiss. And yet, its impact still strengthens every time I hear it.

What makes this early Avenged Sevenfold masterpiece so special is its ability to drag your mind through radically different places within the context of one five-minute piece of music. “Eternal Rest” functions like three different songs in one. It begins with a chaotic Slayer-meets-punk-rock opening: 41 seconds that are as terrifying as they are exhilarating . It then abruptly switches gears, launching into a Pantera-esque groove metal song that is nothing short of aural steroids. If the first “movement” was a panic-inducing barrage of fear, movement two is where you gather your thoughts, dive into the pit, and start beating the shit out of everybody around you. Yet even as the second movement brings the song to a more focused aggression, it’s just as menacing. Lead singer M. Shadow’s demonic howls are the only appropriate delivery for lyrics like: “dark in their hearts/I can feel it burn inside of me/tormented young with no souls watching me/pain in their lives, all they know is misery”. Not to mention the evil guitar harmonies from Synyster Gates and Zacky Vengeance that lurk behind him.

And just when Satan couldn’t find a better soundtrack, the song transitions into its third movement, the very embodiment of morbidity and despair. As a spooky organ creeps into the arrangement, M. Shadows switches to a clean vocal passage that is even more haunting than his screams. All at once, the conceptual reality of eternal rest bludgeons the listener. The inevitable end we all face. The possibility of no afterlife, the possibility that one fateful night we may close our eyes and begin to rot for the rest of existence, with no hope of ever returning. I sound a bit disturbed, don’t I? Listen to the song and try not feeling that way. It’s frightening and it’s infinitely depressing, two emotions that weave in and out seamlessly as the latter half of “Eternal Rest” darkens the mind of the listener.

After quickly reprising the heaviness of the second movement, the song closes out with the bleakest musical passage yet, bringing doomy thoughts of mortality full circle, leaving in its wake an inescapable feeling of emptiness. A twisted tour through fear, rage, death, and hopelessness, the metal perfection of “Eternal Rest” helps explain why Avenged Sevenfold’s ascension in the mid-2000’s was as meteoric as it was.