Stone Sour’s “Hydrograd”: Four Singles Deep

As dictated by the cycle of Corey Taylor – a.k.a. the Great Big Mouth – a new Stone Sour album is upon us.

Step 1: Put out a Slipknot album

Step 2: Write a book

Step 3: Get in a Childish Pissing Match with Another Rockstar Ego in the Press

Step 4: Put out a Stone Sour Album

Step 5: Lather, Rinse, Repeat

Since Mr. Taylor has just recently completed step 3, it’s only fitting that Stone Sour’s sixth album Hydrograd (I’m counting House of Gold & Bones as two separate albums) is dropping this Friday.

And it’s really Stone Sour 2.0 now; Taylor’s Slipknot cohort Jim Root is out, new shredder Christian Martucci is in (he first appeared on Stone Sour’s recent covers EPs Meanwhile in Burbank and Straight Outta Burbank), and apparently the band are reinventing themselves this time around.

Taylor has been hyping this up endlessly (as he does with every single fucking note of music he releases) as a “Rock ‘n’ roll” album of sorts. He has described it in the press as being “tight”, “fast”, “rocking”, “melodic”, “crushing”, and a myriad of other useless adjectives (that last one is especially suspect). But in all seriousness, I was really glad to hear about the band’s change of pace on this LP, ‘cause I think another go ‘round of their Hard Rock/Alt-Metal hybrid would’ve been overkill.

With three days to go, we’re currently four singles deep into Hydrograd’s fifteen-song tracklist. Let’s see how it stacks up so far!

Taipei Person/Allah Tea

Get it??? “Type A Personality”??? Pretty clever eh??? All kidding aside, this is an awesome song. It fuses a chunky Metallica heaviness with a bit of fun ‘80s sleaze. On one hand, the breakdown right after the two-minute mark is pure Ride the Lightning-era ‘Tallica, while carefree lyrics like “running out of road but I’m still doing 75” feel like something off of Appetite for Destruction. When Corey Taylor said in the press that Hydrograd “has everything you want in a rock album”, I can only assume he was talking about “Taipei Person/Allah Tea”.

Song #3

Contrary to what its hipster title might imply, “Song #3” is Stone Sour at their poppiest and most radio friendly. This tune essentially consists of one giant chorus (equipped with layers of guitars and vocal harmonies) and a series of placeholders, whether it’s the super bland palm-muted verses, the anti-climastic guitar solo, or…well, I’ve pretty much covered the whole song. It’s a bit sappy for my taste – it reminds me of a less dynamic “Say You’ll Haunt Me” (Corey Taylor’s love letter to his wife on Stone Sour’s third LP Audio Secrecy). And it leans way too hard on its chorus to carry over four minutes of music.

Fabuless

Yet another cheeky song title. Since its debut back in April, I have spent as much time enjoying this track as I have being confused by it. ‘Cause it sounds like Stone Sour aren’t sure what kind of band they wanna be as they rapidly shift gears from chugging Metal riffs to a Hard Rock chorus to a Groove Metal/Nu Metalish post-chorus (“it’s all downhill from here!”). But that’s not necessarily a bad thing. I enjoy all of this song’s individual components, and Taylor’s seething anti-celebrity lyrics remind me of his hilarious, angry tirades as an author. I should mention Christian Martucci’s ripping guitar solo is a high point as well. This is a very strong single!

Mercy

Without question the weakest link of the bunch, “Mercy” is as unmemorable as they come. Part of me wonders if my distaste for this song is just a product of the band’s uninspired live rendition – and maybe the official recording will do it justice – but that’s pretty doubtful. I especially can’t get over that dud of a lyric in the chorus: “going nowhere, now I’m here”. It just rubs me wrong. That, and in the live video when cameraman fails to pan over to Christian Martucci during his solo? A major pet peeve of mine. We’ll see how this one fares in the context of the full record though.

Hydrograd is out Friday, June 30th on Roadrunner Records. You can catch a full, in-depth review on my YouTube channel the following week!

 

 

November 2016 Album Round Up!

Hey everyone! Nine days into December, I hope all the obnoxious repeats of Mariah Carey, Wham!, and God knows what else by your “spirited” friends and family haven’t broken you yet. I love how these fucking people try to make me feel like the Grinch just ‘cause I don’t want to hear the same five songs every day for a month. I actually love a lot of Christmas tunes, but as someone who will listen to Grindcore on Wednesday, Disco on Thursday, and Shoegaze on Friday, it’s the lack of variety that kills me.

Anyway, ya boy’s in full-on Year End List mode!!! “List Season”, as I deem it, is my favorite time of year every year! I have tons of fun holing myself up for hours on end listening, re-listening, and deliberating for hours on end about lists that 95% of people don’t give two fucks about. But I do give two fucks, and I’ve got a lot to say this year. I’ve already published one list on YouTube, and several more are on their way! Stay tuned! In the meantime, here are eight records I checked out last month. Keep it gangsta.

Battles – In Flames

Sometimes I seriously wonder who the In Flames fanbase consists of at this point. They’ve now spent over a decade making syrupy Metalcore-ish music that seems to have an inverse time-quality relationship (translation: it keeps getting shittier). This newest one, while not as terrible as 2014’s Siren Charms, takes some vocal cues from Bring Me the Horizon (the “melodic gang vocals” that show up in “The End”, “The Truth”, and the final chorus in “Here Until Forever”), puts some late-‘90s In Flames in the microwave, and then overproduces the shit out of it. I actually didn’t mind it that much, but I’ll be sticking with The Jester Race. Here is a full review. NOT RECOMMENDED

We Got It From Here…Thank You 4 Your Service – A Tribe Called Quest

The Queens legends’ swansong and first record in almost 18 years, We Got It From Here picks up RIGHT where classic Tribe albums like Midnight Marauders left off. I’m astonished at how effortlessly these three veterans manage to make music with the same charisma and gusto that they had a quarter of a century ago. This LP is loaded with all kinds of exciting features (Andre 3000, Talib Kweli, Kendrick Lamar, Busta Rhymes, and even Elton John), but ironically, it’s just icing on the cake – the core of the record is three of Hip-Hop’s (dare I say) elder statesmen taking the kids to school. I’m blown away. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

24k Magic – Bruno Mars

I can’t believe Bruno Mars took almost four years to follow up Unorthodox Jukebox! It doesn’t feel that long ago at all, right? Well, he’s back with a third record that expands on the unapologetic throwback sound of “Uptown Funk”, his collaborative smash with producer Mark Ronson. 24K Magic is almost entirely rooted in nostalgia for the Pop and R & B of the ‘80s and ‘90s – much of the production is synth driven, with bombastic clapping snares and funky basslines.  Many of these songs have a brazen sexuality, a dose of braggadocio, and are fairly lighthearted, making for a simple, quick, and easy listen. For me, some of it connects and some of it doesn’t. “Chunky”, “That’s What I Like”, and “24K Magic” are three of my favorite Pop songs of 2016, while I could do without the obnoxious “Perm” and the dull closing ballad “Too Good to Say Goodbye”. Currently, the addictive title track is this LP’s only single, but I imagine that’ll change soon. Future single predictions: “Chunky” and “Versace on the Floor”. RECOMMENDED

Hardwired…To Self-Destruct – Metallica

God, my life was so fucking different the last time Metallica put out a record. Death Magnetic came out EIGHT FUCKING YEARS AGO! Wow. Well, the Thrash legends are finally back with another underwhelming but solid LP. My main issue with much of Metallica’s music remains intact: the meandering song structures. These songs are essentially just piles of riffs stacked on top of each other with little regard for concision or quality control. So there ends up being lots of wasted space. The upside, of course, is James Hetfield delivers a ton of riff gems amongst the wasted space. Fans should be (and seem) happy. Here is a full review. RECOMMENDED

Black America Again – Common

Common’s soulful 11th album is – as its title may suggest – loaded with impassioned social commentary, particularly as it pertains to race relations in America. The powerful title track addresses the Flint water crisis, refers to mass incarceration as “the new plantation”, and comments on racism in sports (“Maria Sharapova making more than Serena”). It all feels like a call-to-action for the black community. While profound and sobering, these weighty themes do start to take their toll on the listener, which is why light-hearted breathers like “Love Star”, “Unfamiliar”, and “Red Wine” are helpful. But for me, the best thing about Black America Again is Common’s bars! Look no further than the song “Pyramids” or the amazing first verse on “A Bigger Picture Called Free” for lyrical gymnastics that we haven’t heard from the Chicago OG in forever. He does some of the best rapping of his career on here. And content-wise, he has a lot to say. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

Starboy – The Weeknd

 Cut out the filler, kids. The Weeknd’s third studio Starboy would’ve been one of the best albums of the year if he had done just that. There is so much FIRE on here, particularly on the first half of the record, but as a listener, I feel like he wastes a good 20 minutes of my time within these 18 tracks. “Attention, “Rockin”, Nothing Without You”, “All I Know”…these all could’ve gotten the axe. STILL, I have been bumping this LP non-stop since it came out – I really do love its tortured-partier themes, its butter smooth production, The Weeknd’s unique croon, and the night-time atmosphere the songs suck me into. The title track is one of 2016’s greatest moments, and there are a good eight or nine other bangers on here that I’m gonna continue to vibe with. RECOMMENDED

Atoma – Dark Tranquillity 

One of my favorite Metal bands of all time and I didn’t review this, even though I wrote about the singles and everything. Why? Well, I didn’t have much to say about it. If I reviewed it, I would’ve given it a strong 7/light 8 and said something to the effect of “this is another great DT album”. But at this point, there are already ten of those! So even though the music is solid on Atoma, it’s starting to feel like I’ve heard everything I’m gonna hear from them. So I cherry-picked my favorite tracks (“Atoma”, “Forward Momentum”, “Our Proof of Life”, “Clearing Skies”) and moved on. I’m hoping for a bit more surprises next go ‘round! RECOMMENDED

Built to Last – Hammerfall

Power Metal mainstays Hammerfall are on their tenth album now. And if you didn’t already expect a rehashing of the band’s other nine LPs, the third track “Sacred Vow” uses multiple previous song titles as lyrics. Look, if you’re into this type of Power Metal – Priest/Maiden throwback sound combined with corny lyrics about warriors, I can definitely recommend Hammerfall’s Steel Meets Steel compilation from 2007 (particularly the second disc). But this record here? You don’t need to hear it. It’s the exact same shit. I’m not gonna say Built to Last is a bad album, ‘cause it’s not a blatantly “bad” album. I just don’t particularly care that it exists. NOT RECOMMENDED

 

 

 

Anthrax – For All Kings Review

Evil Twin Write-Up

The official edited version of this review is available here.

Four and a half years ago, after enduring a messy revolving door of singers for nearly a decade– featuring reunions, re-reunions, and one virtual unknown in Dan Nelson – Anthrax mustered up a modern Metal classic against all odds. 2011’s Worship Music, the band’s first with ‘80s-era frontman Joey Belladonna in over 20 years, marked not only a return to form for Anthrax, but arguably a career peak. An album that once threatened to become the Chinese Democracy for headbangers emerged as a definitive statement from one of Thrash Metal’s Big Four.

The genre’s notorious Mount Rushmore – rounded out by Metallica, Slayer, and Megadeth – historically joined forces on stage for the first time in Summer 2010, celebrating nearly 30 years of American heavy metal’s most essential movement, culminating with a show at Anthrax’s hometown Yankee Stadium the following year. In addition to capitalizing on an increasing nostalgia for the art form, all four groups have enjoyed reinvigoration in the studio as well, with Slayer and Megadeth both unleashing new albums to critical acclaim, and Metallica’s follow-up to the platinum-selling Death Magnetic due out later this year.

Anthrax once again enters the fold with For All Kings, their 11th full-length and a worthy successor to the monstrous Worship Music. One of the main ingredients that ultimately distinguishes the New Yorkers from their Bay Area peers is having a melodious, powerhouse singer in Joey Belladonna. As opposed to the gruffness of Metallica’s James Hetfield or the snarl of Megadeth’s Dave Mustaine, Belladonna’s vocals are akin to hearing Iron Maiden’s Bruce Dickinson backed by speedier, more muscular riffs. His pipes afford Anthrax the ability to be noticeably more tuneful in some instances, albeit still ferocious.

At fifty-five years of age, For All Kings finds Belladonna delivering his most commanding vocal performance to date, elevating these meaty chunks of speed metal to astonishingly anthemic heights. Even when the rest of the band seems to briefly lose a step, an impossibly huge chorus always seems to be lurking around the corner, showcased best in the otherwise run-of-the-mill “This Battle Chose Us” and the non-essential but excellent title track.

As a five-piece, the middle of the album is where Anthrax make a seriously convincing case for their place on the Metal pantheon. “Defend Avenge” gets the gold medal in the riff category with rhythm guitarist Scott Ian’s uptempo Black Sabbath worship. “Evil Twin” and “Breathing Lightning” both turned out to be excellent choices for singles, as they contain some of the record’s best moments. “Lightning’ is equipped with an almost radio-ready chorus and infectious riffing from Ian, and “Twin” is the Thrash Titans at their most pummeling, also making some poignant political statements about “ideology used as a weapon”. Belladonna once again asserts his crucial role on “Blood Eagle Wings”, a thunderously epic masterwork that, simply put, none of Anthrax’s peers could pull off.

For All Kings is also the band’s first LP with former Shadows Fall axe man Jon Donais, who replaced the talented Rob Caggiano in 2013. Donais proves himself more than a worthy addition and an exceptional fit, especially on the appropriately larger-than-life solo in “Blood Eagle Wings”, the squealing, harmonic-laden licks in “Monster at the End”, and an extended lead that gives album opener “You Gotta Believe” a sharp kick in the teeth just as it begins to coast. As for the Anthrax rhythm section, legendary blastbeat pioneer Charlie Benante continues to be unparalleled in his line of work, maintaining a breakneck pace alongside his nephew, bassist Frank Bello.

The lackluster moments don’t emerge until the final three tracks. “All of Them Thieves” is the sole glaring piece of filler. “This Battle Chose Us” simply underwhelms in the wake of the murderer’s row that occurred in the middle of the album. Chaotic closer “Zero Tolerance”, while certainly a battering assault, occasionally feels like aggression for aggression’s sake, but is a satisfyingly jolting conclusion nevertheless.

While For All Kings might not have quite the staggering greatness of its predecessor, it comes dangerously close. It’s an affair that should leave fans fully satiated, and it sits comfortably in the upper echelon of the band’s celebrated discography.

Score: 3.5/5