All Time Low’s “Last Young Renegade”: Four Singles Deep

When I think “ATL”, a few things tend to spring to mind. Trap music is definitely the first thing. The Falcons in ’06 when they had Michael Vick, that’s another one. As is Donald Glover’s outstanding new television series Atlanta – which, it breaks my heart that it won’t be back this year due to Glover’s role as Lando Calrisian in the upcoming Han Solo movie.

But at second glance, ATL is also an acronym for one of the biggest, best, and now – dare I say – seasoned Pop Punk bands, All Time Low.

I grew up a Metalhead, so All Time Low were really the exception to the rule, offering me periodic breaths of fresh, bubbly Pop Punk air in between the bouts of Extreme Metal savagery that were consuming my life. Along with Yellowcard, Jimmy Eat World, New Found Glory, and a few others, All Time Low were my window into a scene that I casually enjoyed but was not a part of.

Surprisingly, this quartet’s adolescent angst has aged gracefully for me, as I routinely find myself running back to favorites like “Stella”, “Six Feet Under the Stars”, and “Break Your Little Heart”. But when it comes to keeping up with their new output, I’ve been relatively tuned out – 2011’s Dirty Work and 2015’s Future Hearts still have yet to find their way to my ears. But as soon as they announced their seventh album Last Young Renegade, I knew it was time to check back in.

The LP drops this Friday, and we’ve already got 40 percent of it at our disposal in the form of four different pre-album singles – let’s see how they stack up as we head into release day!

Last Young Renegade

Rather than warm up the stove and let the water boil for a bit, All Time Low shoot for pure ANTHEM with this opening title track (hey, it worked for Judas Priest on Painkiller, Black Sabbath on Sabbath Bloody Sabbath, and….yeah sorry, all my off-the-cuff references here are Metal ones). I love the “no bullshit, let’s get into it” approach, and if you ask me, they stuck the landing. There are two key elements to this song’s success: a) the addictive clean guitar part that drives the verses (and later doubles as the song’s piano outro), and b) the way the first 5 syllables of the chorus stab at the listener in unison along with all the instruments – it’s a powerful effect. Can’t get this one out of my head.

Dirty Laundry

You know what this song is? It’s a brilliant fake-out. For the first 2-and-half minutes, it has such a light, unassuming Pop touch to it that you forget you’re listening to All Time Low….and as soon as you forget that, the band explode out of the guitar solo into the climactic final chorus. That shift is so effortlessly executed! I also have to commend this song for sticking to a cohesive theme – the “dirty laundry” metaphor is kept afloat throughout with cheeky lines like “sometimes I trip over your history” or “her closet’s such a mess/filled up with all the skeletons she’s kept”. Loving this one too!

Nice2KnoU

Here we have a tune that reeks of (relatively inoffensive) genericism. The chanting, the peppy dance groove in the chorus that I knew would show up somewhere on this LP….it’s all something I could’ve conjured up in my head before I ever heard it. The band explained that this song is dedicated to fans and supporters who helped them in their early days….which, I never would’ve gotten that from these one-size-fits-all lyrics. It’s a very average song if you ask me.

Life of the Party

The first time I heard this track, I immediately winced in disgust at those glitch-y chipmunk vocals – one of modern Pop production’s most annoyingly overused trends. “Fuck, didn’t we JUST go through this with the new Linkin Park album?,” I thought to myself. But the more I listened, the more I realized this song TOTALLY pulls off the whole “I’m a rich rock star who constantly parties but underneath it all I’m depressed and worn out” type thing. Kind of like “I Took a Pill in Ibiza”, though “Life of the Party” specifically deals with a) alcoholism and excess, and b) the underlying identity crisis as a result of that lifestyle; frontman Alex Gaskarth finds himself staring into the mirror asking himself questions like “what the fuck is the reason now?”, and realizing that “in a sea of strangers, I can’t find me anymore” (the latter lyric is a favorite of mine). I find myself sympathizing with him immensely in what I see as a cautionary tale – the lifestyle he once glorified is beginning to eat him alive.

Having taken a five-year hiatus from new All Time Low albums, these singles are making me really glad I’m popping back in for Last Young Renegade. I’m curious to hear the remaining six songs – is what we’ve heard so far indicative of the rest of the record? Is this just the top layer of mindblowing greatness, or are we hearing the four “good” tracks from an otherwise unexciting snoozefest? And most importantly, what the hell is that Tegan and Sara feature gonna sound like on “Ground Control”? Guess we’ll have to wait and see!