Megadeth’s “Dystopia” Single

Yesterday Megadeth released the title track and single number three from their upcoming fifteenth (!) studio album Dystopia, due out January 22nd.

Interestingly enough, after the near-universal panning that 2013’s Supercollider received from fans and critics alike, Megadeth have once again found themselves in the underdog position with album number fifteen, one in which they have tended to thrive throughout their career. And with the three singles unveiled thus far, the band is certainly showing a lot of promise. First the thrashy “Fatal Illusion” (which I wrote about here) and “The Threat is Real”, and now “Dystopia”.

To my ears, “Dystopia” is the strongest of all three, but perhaps most notably, it’s the most tuneful. See there’s a period in Megadeth’s career – the one metalheads tirelessly and (mostly unjustly) rail against – in which their brand of metal became more song-centric. It began with Countdown to Extinction and progressed through Youthanasia and Cryptic Writings (both of which I earn minority status by holding in high esteem), before crashing and burning with Risk. But here’s the catch: despite much of the Thrash being absent in Megadeth’s mid-90s output, Mustaine’s songwriting was exceptional. The well-crafted hooks – whether on vocals or guitar, mind you – are light years beyond the capacities of most bands of the Thrash persuasion. But with the breakneck pace and sneering confrontation of Megadeth’s early years missing, it’s understandable why these albums didn’t fare too well. In reality, what truly needs to happen for a stellar Megadeth release is a fusion of the aforementioned song construction with balls-to-the-wall, guitar-driven speed metal. And “Dystopia” might be the closest we’ve gotten to a sonic manifestation of this dream in quite some time.

The track opens with a mid-tempo groove and a simplistic, ear candy guitar melody a la Youthanasia. From there, hasty yet modestly concise verses allow the guitars to take center stage, the long solo section after the second chorus being Exhibit A. In general, “Dystopia” is peppered with the most exciting guitar solos that have been on a Megadeth track in God knows how long. Let’s be honest, Kiko Loureiro SMOKES every Megadeth guitarist since Marty Friedman. I don’t care what you think. Like what the actual fuck is he doing with those octaves at 1:43??? I really hope an official songbook comes out for Dystopia so I can give some of these mind-blowing licks a spin.

But “Hangar 18”-style extended leads aside, Mustaine and Co. still bring the riffs. The winding groove after the solo section is classic Megadeth before the song is given a dramatic send off with an dopamine-pumping dual guitar harmony that crescendos beautifully to wrap everything up.

A Megadeth diehard, I’ve been in a state of “eager anticipation” since the announcement of Dystopia back in October. But the title track, which balances out the energy of “Fatal Illusion” and “The Threat Is Real” perfectly – clueing us in to what has the potential to be an excellent, well-rounded release – has allowed me to say I’m “excited” now for reasons other than just being a fucking stan. January 22nd, I’m ready for you!

UPDATE: Full Dystopia review here

Megadeth’s “Fatal Illusion” Single

In the Megadeth world, the last year or so has been a PR whirlwind. There was the failed reunion of the Rust in Peace lineup, the sudden departure of guitarist Chris Broderick and drummer Shawn Drover, the exciting replacement drummer no one saw coming in Lamb of God’s Chris Adler, and a whole lot of sensationalized Blabbermouth headlines. In all fairness, it’s publicity like this that keeps a band relevant after releasing an album that was truly a skid mark on their legendary discography. Being the Megadeth diehard that I am, Super Collider remains the only album by the band that I cannot listen to (yep, Risk included – without Megadeth’s name on it, there’s some decent alternative rock hidden in there). The only thing that could’ve possibly ignited my interest in Super Collider’s follow-up was if the band recruited one of my favorite drummers and potentially my favorite guitar player of all-time…. wait a second, those would be Megadeth’s brand new members, the aforementioned Chris Adler and Angra’s Kiko Loureiro! Based on this alone, Megadeth’s instant jump in my mind from “washed up” to “I can’t wait for their new album” makes me feel like such a wishy washy hypocrite.

This past Thursday, Megadeth’s fifteenth album became public knowledge, with the title, release date, track list, and some truly awesome cover art all revealed, along with the premiere of first single “Fatal Illusion”. The album will be called Dystopia, and won’t be out until January 22nd of next year. I’m not sure whether to be charmed by Universal’s traditional album roll out or concerned by such a resistance to industry change. Either way, we now have the first Megadeth song since June 2013, and I couldn’t have been more curious to hear it.

“Fatal Illusion” is – at a minimum– the best Megadeth song since 2009’s Endgame. After a well-executed intro that allows the song to gradually build, we’re greeted by one of the meatiest bass tones I have ever heard, as David Ellefson introduces the main riff “Peace Sells” style. After that, it’s everything that makes Megadeth great, and everything Super Collider was missing. The song’s powerful main riff is amplified by Chris Adler’s hard-hitting double bass, which segues into a catchy verse groove straight out of the Rust in Peace playbook. Kiko Loureiro and Dave Mustaine sprinkle some indulgent lead playing throughout, adding some spice to the song’s structure. By the time the band erupts into the breakneck bridge section, “Fatal Illusion” has already sold itself. Megadeth are not fucking around this time.

Sonically, “Fatal Illusion” is along the lines of United Abominations and Endgame – the production strikes a successful balance between polish and edge. In addition to Ellefson’s stunning bass tone, the guitars and drums sound like Megadeth again, as opposed to the muddiness of Super Collider and its predecessor, Th1rt3en. Perhaps the biggest critical headache on Super Collider was Dave Mustaine’s lazy, painfully corny lyrical content, but “Fatal Illusion” makes significant strides in this department, despite the backseat role lyrics often assume in Megadeth. If you ask me, “It’s a fatal illusion that evil never dies” is pretty fucking badass.

With “Fatal Illusion”, Megadeth have made quite the statement. Super Collider is already disappearing from the rear view mirror, and the band’s new lineup gives the metal community – young and old – something to be truly excited about. I’m eagerly anticipating Dystopia’s January 22nd release. Well, either that or its inevitable leak.

Recap of September 18th Releases

This past Friday, September 18th, was like Christmas. Dozens of the most heavily anticipated early-fall releases were unleashed onto the world. Having a set of working ears on this day was like having a fucking golden ticket. So many exciting releases from so many different corners of the industry. While I am most certainly still sorting through the ashes and gathering my senses, I would like to share the seven releases that I’ve given the most attention these past four days.

Long Live – Atreyu

Returning from a four-year hiatus, metalcore veterans Atreyu exceed any and all expectations on this superb return-to-form, effortlessly revisiting some of the best moments from their catalogue, adding quite a bit of muscle to their sound in the process. Read my initial review of the title track here, and watch my full review of the album below:

GO:OD AM – Mac Miller

Already universally hailed as his best work to date, Mac Miller comes back from a messy battle with substances with more confidence and self-assurance than ever. GO:OD AM is fun and ambitious, yet never overindulgent. With minimal contributions from guests, the spotlight never leaves Miller, and he doesn’t waste a second. Tracks like “ROS” and “Jump” are some of the best hip hop songs of 2015. Read my full review of the album here.

Pagans in Vegans – Metric

More stadium-ready, energetic, absurdly catchy electro-pop from Metric, who – along with 2009’s Fantasies and 2012’s Synthetica – have now made a trio of top-notch albums. Though my ears may be clamoring for more of the guitar-driven sounds of the band’s earlier work, it is impossible to be mad at tracks like “Cascades”, “Fortunes” and “The Shade”. Slower moments like “The Governess” add a nice contrast.

Metal Allegiance – Metal Allegiance

Along with a murderer’s row of guest appearances, “Metal Allegiance” features the core lineup of Megadeth’s David Ellefson, Testament’s Alex Skolnick, and ex-Dream Theater/current Winery Dogs drummer Mike Portnoy. Given the involvement of thrash legends like Skolnick and Ellefson, it comes as no surprise that tracks like the crushing opener “Gift of Pain” – which features Lamb of God’s Randy Blythe – pay homage to the Bay Area. The unlikely duet of Dug Pinnick of King’s X and Hatebreed’s Jamey Jasta works tremendously on “Wait Until Tomorrow”. “Let Darkness Fall”, featuring Troy Sanders of Mastodon, is another highlight. The album also closes with a ripping cover of the classic Dio track “We Rock”. An incredibly fun, larger-than-life project that is loaded with first ballot heavy metal hall-of-famers. Let’s pray we get to see this live.

Abysmal – The Black Dahlia Murder

If there’s one feeling Black Dahlia fans aren’t quite familiar with, it’s disappointment. Seven albums in, and we’re still getting top shelf death metal. The dizzying technicality and manic riffage of “Re-Faced” are like an old friend stopping by and checking up on you, just making sure you’re still cool. “The Fog” contains the albums thrashiest moments, while the doomy “Stygiophobic” gives the album a welcome dose of breathing room. Ranking Abysmal in the band’s discography will take more than a few listens, but Black Dahlia continue to uphold the high death metal standards they’ve set for themselves.

Threat to Survival – Shinedown

Threat to Survival is certainly a good batch of catchy, radio-friendly rock songs, with soaring, defiant choruses and stomping grooves. What it is not, however, is the edgier, borderline-metal riff-fest that was 2012’s Amaryllis. Despite occasional misses like the sappy album closer “Misfits”, and the dull “It All Adds Up”, frontman Brent Smith’s ear for choruses remains undeniable, and Threat to Survival is highly recommended for fans of Papa Roach, Buckcherry, and Saving Abel.

I Hurt (single) – Children of Bodom

“I Hurt” is the opening track and now third single from Children of Bodom’s forthcoming I Worship Chaos album, due out October 2nd. I was not a fan of first single “Morrigan” initially (though I was probably just cranky), but the pummeling title track pulled the band back into my good graces. New single “I Hurt” features a heavy Pantera-style groove that is unorthodox for the band, yet adds a whole new layer of aggression. Elsewhere, the tune is classic Bodom, and my ears are definitely tingling in anticipation for the release of I Worship Chaos.