Care Package is Way Better Than Drake’s REAL Albums

This past Friday, Aubrey Drake Graham dropped the clumsily titled Care Package, a collection of old b-sides, rarities, and unofficial singles that nobody asked for but everyone’s listening to. It’s set to debut at number one on the Billboard Charts this week.

Being the retrospective project that it is, Care Package reminds us of several things we might have forgotten. It reminds us that “Johnny Football” was once a thing (see: “Draft Day”). It reminds us that J. Cole once apologized for saying “retarded” in jest (see: “Jodeci Freestyle”). But here’s the one big fat reminder that Care Package serves up: Drake can’t make albums like he makes songs.

As a loose collection, the Care Package track-list arguably flows better than Drake’s last three albums (or FOUR, if God forbid you wanna separate Scorpion into two). It’s more lyrically proficient than Nothing Was the Same, it’s less narcissistic than Scorpion, and as for Views…well, there’s certainly less Dancehall pandering.

I love the lyrical toughness of tracks like “Dreams Money Can Buy”. I love the introspection of “4PM in Calabasas”. I love the biting bitterness of “How Bout Now”. I love hearing Drake trade bars with J. Cole on “Jodeci Freestyle” and Rick Ross on “Free Spirit”, and find myself wishing his real albums were more feature-friendly.

Now don’t get me wrong, this is by no means a wholesale endorsement of this project. Some cuts, like the plodding “My Side”, are flat-out terrible. And there are more than a couple of reminders on Care Package  that no matter what era we’re talking about, Singing Drizzy is never as good as Rapping Drizzy. Ever.

I’m merely pointing out the glaring contrast between the invigorated Drake on these b-sides who’s just, to quote his lyrics, “do(ing) it just to do it like it’s nothing”, and the tiresome insular self-obsession of Drake’s last few LPs. This guy has so much raw talent, but when he goes to put an ALBUM together, it’s like he’s trying too hard. Don’t believe me? It took him branding something a mixtape (If You’re Reading This) for it to garner deserved critical acclaim.

We’ll forever remember Drake for his great songs, of which there are many. If only he’d stop overthinking his albums, maybe we’ll have a chance to remember him for those too.

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